Your management style will affect your company’s success. Get it right, and you’ll be on the right track. Get it wrong, and everything you’ve built could crumble to the ground in the blink of an eye.

 

As a boss, you’re in charge. This is part of the job as it’s your idea and your reputation on the line. However, there is a difference between having the final say on decisions and controlling every aspect of the business.

 

The former makes you a control freak. The best way to tell if you fall into this category is to watch out for the signs. Here are four of them and the solutions to repairing the problem.

 

You Think You Know Everything

 

You might know a little about a lot, but this doesn’t make you an expert at everything. The best leaders understand their weak areas and put plans in place to remedy them. This is why outsourcing has grown exponentially in the last decade. Without a professional website designer or security administrator, not only would your digital presence be lacking, but your information would be easy to steal. The key is to let go and hire trustworthy third-parties to fill in the gaps.

 

You Believe You’re The Difference

 

Thinking that you’re the difference is another way of saying that you believe you’re totally responsible for the firm’s success. Not only is this level of ego unhealthy, but it’s bad for business because it lowers morale. Your employees need to feel loved. When they don’t, they leave, and the turnover rate skyrockets. To stop this and save a chunk of change, you must give praise where it’s due. Someone who has done a good job needs reminding, or else they’ll be disillusioned with the workplace environment and their productivity levels will tank.

 

You Try And Control The Uncontrollable

 

Some things can’t be stopped. The Covid-19 pandemic is a prime example. Yes, you can put measures in place to help the company survive, yet you can’t stop the spread of the virus. Have you wasted time doing things that make no difference in a bid to ease your conscience? If so, you should accept that you can’t prevent the storm from coming. Instead, it’s imperative to focus your energy on what you can control. Otherwise, you’ll spend most of your day worrying about bad things and become embroiled in negativity.

 

People Tell You

 

Employees aren’t shy to voice their concerns. Even those who are wary about arguing with the boss will do it in a way that’s hard to analyze. For instance, they’ll make a passing comment or frame it as a joke. “You’re a control freak,” they say, with a smile on their face. The smile is a defense mechanism, which means there’s an element of truth to their words. You need to listen to what people are saying to you and about you since opinions matter. You won’t like everything, yet the ability to take them in and analyze them is crucial for leaders.

 

Do you have a problem with control? How will you tweak the balance?