There are few things better in business than a truly good client. A client who knows what they want, is willing to build a good long-term relationship, doesn’t ask for the moon, and doesn’t cause trouble is worth more than their weight in gold. When you have a client like that, you don’t want to spoil your chances of holding onto them. As such, here are a few mistakes that you want to avoid and a few tips on how to do it.

Making a bad first impression

It can be difficult to control the initial impression you leave on your client. You don’t always know how they’re going to first engage with your brand. However, there are tips you can follow to leave a better impression, such as ensuring that any landing page, websites, and social media you rely on are up-to-date, accurate, and well-presented. If you’re meeting them face-to-face or talking on the phone, then being polite and listening actively is key.

 

Being inconsistent with your communication

If customers have a hard time contacting you or if you can’t seem to decide how you want to contact them, it can be annoying. Establish a method of communication, be it through an IM client, email, phone call, or otherwise. Make sure that you have set hours that they can reliably get in touch with you and, if you’re busy, ensure that you’re using something like a virtual receptionist that can at least take a message for you and inform your client.

 

Making promises too freely

You might feel inclined to promise the client the moon and even believe what you’re saying. However, you should never promise what you can’t deliver. You can talk about plans but if they go beyond your usual delivery, wait until you talk with your team and plan out the potential scope of the project before you promise it. It’s always better to under-promise and over-deliver than vice-versa.

 

Being late

Simply put, being late shows that you do not value your client’s time. Whether it’s for a meeting, a call, an email, or a deadline, being late is death to any notion that you are a reliable service provider. Make sure you’re using any tools you can, including appointment scheduling software to prevent this from happening. If you are going to be late and simply cannot avoid it, then give your client as much forewarning as possible.

 

Not apologizing

If you make a mistake, including any of those mentioned above, then you should be ready and willing to apologize specifically for what you have done wrong. Getting clients to forgive you for one mistake isn’t too difficult in most cases. It’s failing to acknowledge your mistake that will sink your chances.

 

If you have a good client, you should be doing everything you can to keep hold of them, even if it means showing a little flex that you wouldn’t normally. They will become the lifeblood of your business if you handle them well.